July 10th

We are not amused.

It is too hot.

I am an English gardener, not a sun worshipper – not a sitter-on-beaches or a basker-in-parks interloper. I should be at rest only during the harshest winter (after a long year’s work), and yet, here I am, not in the garden…

I hide in shade or lurk in cold baths, flashing mossy fangs at people suggesting social events during daylight hours. I don’t mind a summer thunderstorm – how can one resist the decadence of storms? When the cling-film sunshine is overcome by the velvet of actual weather? – But the sun these days is a bully.

Like the grass, I turn brittle in the heat. A newt left out on a paving slab. A dry seed-head rattled by the kick of a leaping grasshopper – legs scraping like nails on a comb. Everything papery and stubbled.

We islanders talk a good game about craving the sunshine, but we still need our regular watering…

I begin to dream seriously of Elsewhere.

 

The soul makes a katabasis. The mind dips deep below the surface, and in a cool place, shimmers. For everything there is a waiting time. Enforced stillness. Lessons whispered in the breath between phrases.

 

This, I suppose, makes the intensity lovely.

 

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A Cheeky Look Back at Spring…

June 17th 2018 – Purple Lace

 

A few left over photographs of stunning summer grasses I can’t get let go to waste…

 

Honey Garlic

 

With great thanks to Audrey, who correctly identified my mystery plant – this charming Honey Garlic (Allium Siculum) has been very shy coming out, so I can’t wait until all her bells have all opened…

 

June 11th 2018 – Neglect

Let us swear an oath, and keep it with equal mind,
In the hollow Lotos-land to live and lie reclined
On the hills like Gods together, careless of mankind…

Tennyson

 

A neglected garden tells its own story. Sometimes happy, sometimes sad. Almost always there is still beauty to be found.

 

May 15th 2018 – Any Ideas?

Sometimes, even the best laid plans get sidelined. You can be philosophical about irritating set-backs, as the chess master Patrick Wolff says: ‘If you try to over-control what you think you will achieve, you’ll miss what you can actually accomplish.’

Nice, right? I like to find smarter people than me to excuse/substantiate/embellish what would otherwise come under the category of ‘total disaster’.

Anyway, whatever the reasons, when you can’t get out and do respectable gardener’s gardening, you just have to go with the flow and enjoy the weeds.

How about buttercups, dandelions, and wild chives sweetening a sunny evening?

 

 

A few other surprises have popped up to remind me that last October I went on a bulb planting frenzy and just put every bulb I found languishing about the shed in the ground to see what happened. Most of them didn’t emerge, but some came up marvelous!

Unfortunately, I may have been a tad slapdash towards the end, because I certainly remember planting Alliums to pop up under the kitchen window…

 

 

But I don’t remember planting them so close to the Astilbes…

 

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Whoops! Never mind. The alliums will have orbited away before the pink and white plumes come out, and then I’ll dig them up and move them along – trying to remember that the bald patches will yield foxgloves next year. I’ve got plenty of plants to fill the gaps waiting for me when I have the opportunity to get my hands dirty again.

This is the thing when you don’t stick to a rigid plan in the garden. You set yourself up some lovely surprises!

Speaking of which… does anybody know what these two strapping green sentinels are most likely to be when they pop open?

 

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I feel like there should be a sweepstake…

 

April 26th 2018 – Intrigue and Mystery

As I’ve been investigating plant properties of late, and as I am something of a bibliophile, I’ve been nosing about all sorts of source material in my research.

From botanical journals to old wives’ lore, and those periodicals of note in between where plant and myth meet – the carry-on between thinking and planting is complex, and hearty.

The gardener might naturally take particular interest in any writings on nature, plants and the garden itself, but there’s always a new context to consider and steal from. Have you heard of a shadow garden, for example? A midnight garden? A physic garden in the front, with a hawthorn portal into various alternative dimensions in the back..? I mean, the design potential is inexhaustible…

I came across a concept recently, which I’ve doubtless read a hundred times before, but for some reason (probably my parallel literary research) it’s got my creative juices flowing.

This was the idea of something called The Hallow.

‘The Hallow is an old concept that retains the idea of an ancient center of equilibrium. It is unchanged by anything that has ever had contact with it […] No theology, religion or spiritual system has ever influenced its existence.

‘The Hallow stands between the material reality and non-material reality. It is neither, and it makes it possible for both dimensions to interact without collapsing either one.’

Raven Grimassi

Well, colour me intrigued.

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Ideas and concepts about in-betweenness – the liminal, the uncanny, the unnamable, the abject and obscure – have always been a personal fascination of mine (my favourite art is that which either manages to, or at least tries to, express the inarticulate). But the idea of this as a place is just thrilling. Especially as a place you can access! Not so much go to, perhaps, but draw from. What a sensation!

And it makes perfect sense.

Have you ever found yourself lost in a wild place? That sensation of being very much somewhere – surrounded by the natural, the real, the solid, the temporal – yet the creeping fear comes from a sensation of exactly the opposite?

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Gorgeous stuff.

Never judge a book by its cover! If you’re into plants, you might as well go really into plants. Good luck with it!

(As an aside, if you’re interested in gardens you can truly get lost in, I’ll be posting something about a genuinely terrifying garden at the weekend if I get round to it!)